[admin post] Admin Post: Nominations guidelines

Sep. 22nd, 2017 02:38 pm
pocketmouse: the legs of three people in a bed - captioned 'holly poly' (hollypoly-legs)
[personal profile] pocketmouse posting in [community profile] holly_poly
Here's the breakdown for how nominations to the tagset should work this year. I'll post a link to the tagset tomorrow, please use this post to ask about any questions related to the nominations process or regarding metafandoms. As we approve tags and have questions related to your nominations, I'll start a new post with those questions.

Nominating fandoms:

For Marvel and DC, generally we end up with nominations for the top-level All Media Type tags (which are Marvel and DCU respectively), mid-level metafandoms (eg MCU, DCU (Comics)), and specific fandoms (eg Hawkeye (Comics), The Flash (TV)).

For things like video game series (Final Fantasy, Fire Emblem) and TV shows with rolling continuity (Doctor Who and Torchwood, Buffy and Angel) it’s preferable to nominate on a metafandom. If you’re planning on nominating something like this, feel free to discuss in comments, otherwise we’ll ask for clarification as they come up in nominations. Fandoms with mostly rolling continuity but some bumps (Star Trek as a whole vs AOS, X-Men movies, etc) usually get grouped into multiple metafandoms in the same way as Marvel or DCU, but there’s less need to get as detailed (ie Star Trek and AOS as the only two categories is fine, no need to specify TNG vs DS9).

Nominating fandoms in this way also helps cut down on the need for crossovers. If you’re nominating a relationship that is a crossover, it gets nominated to the fandom Crossover. But if you’re nominating within a metafandom, that’s not an issue (see below for more details).

Generally speaking, if one media format AND the All Media Types format of a fandom are nominated, we’ll select the AMT type, though we will try and ask for clarification if it happens (since directors can make movies very different from the books).



Nominating relationships:

Please make sure it has three characters, and uses the / symbol instead of the & symbol between all characters.

Please always nominate to the highest applicable metafandom. If you do not disambiguate while nominating a relationship, it’ll be placed in the highest applicable metafandom. If you have multiple disambiguations in one relationship, it will be placed in the highest applicable metafandom.

Examples:

James "Bucky" Barnes/Steve Rogers/Sam Wilson: gets assigned to Marvel, since it could mean comics or MCU.
James "Bucky" Barnes/Steve Rogers/Sam Wilson (MCU): I assume this means one disambiguation for the relationship as a whole, and put it in MCU.
James "Bucky" Barnes(Ultimates)/Steve Rogers (MCU)/Sam Wilson (MCU): there is a comics disambig and a movies disambig so it gets assigned to Marvel, which covers both.

The interview for the awesome job -

Sep. 22nd, 2017 09:14 am
[personal profile] rattlecatcher
was this morning.

"The" interview (as opposed to the thousands of others I've had in the last six months, I guess) went well. But that's no guarantee, you know? There are seven other candidates - they did four yesterday and they'll have four next Tuesday, so the absolute soonest they'd have an answer is Tuesday night. I was first, 8:30-10:00 AM, and then I cooled my heels for an hour and worked 11-4 same as usual.

During the course of a workday, I might be at several different posts: I could be in the Welcome area, I could be upstairs at Adult reference, maybe I'm orbiting somewhere out on the floor, maybe I'm on the phones, which are tucked away in an admin area that may or may not have people near. It's where the staff conference room is, which is where I had my interview.

So in the afternoon I'm in the Welcome area, and a woman comes in, looking around. I ask if I can assist her and she says she's just looking around. I see her again later and she says she has an appointment with ____, and I realize, what ho, a rival.

Don't worry, I didn't scare her off. )

wolf 359 fic and BINGO!

Sep. 22nd, 2017 06:48 pm
frith_in_thorns: I don't have to "agree" to anything. I'm the commander. (W359 Agree)
[personal profile] frith_in_thorns
...I have literally just realised the two sentences in my icon are the wrong way round. It will now really annoy me until I'm motivated enough to remake it, because I don't think I saved a draft copy. (If you are reading this in the future where it in fact starts with "I'm the commander" then please ignore this.)

Anyway! Episode 54 of Wolf 359, was, as promised, A Lot, and I wrote a ridiculously ott-angsty missing scene on the bus because MINKOWSKI AAAAAAAAGH!

Under Control, 500 words. SPOILERS. On the Hephaestus, everything is completely fine.

(I think I'm going to stop posting fic on DW again because I don't think anyone reads it here. Straight to AO3 seems to be the way to go these days.)

Then I realised that it fills the "slaves" square for my hc_bingo card, and therefore I have completed a bingo line! The first time ever I have done so in the actual challenge period rather than scraping in under amnesty.

I will be back before too long with a new bingo card!
andrewducker: (Default)
[personal profile] andrewducker
Jane and I went up to Nethy Bridge, near Aviemore, and stayed at the Lazy Duck in one of their Eco-Lodges. Which is a cabin built for two, with electricity, gas cooking, and (distant, wobbly) wifi, right next to a large duck pond full of a variety of different species of ducks.
Loads of photos and four videos )
ladyofleithian: (Default)
[personal profile] ladyofleithian posting in [community profile] whole_new_world
Title: Second Mother

Author: ladyofleithian

Fandom: Star Wars, Episode VII: The Force Awakens

Characters: Shara Bey, Poe Dameron/Ben Solo, Kes Dameron, Leia Organa, Han Solo, Snoke

Table-Prompt: Alternate Reality/Changing Canon -- Dead Character(s) Alive

Warnings: Aftermath of torture, graphic violence

Asima Chatterjee's 100th Birthday

Sep. 22nd, 2017 05:17 pm
[syndicated profile] googledoodles_feed

Asima Chatterjee's 100th Birthday

Date: September 23, 2017

When Dr. Asima Chatterjee was growing up in Calcutta in the 1920s and 1930s, it was almost unheard of for a woman to study chemistry. It must have been a great surprise, then, when Chatterjee not only completed her undergraduate studies in organic chemistry, but went on to receive a Doctorate of Science, the first woman to do so in India!

Dr. Chatterjee went on to make groundbreaking developments in medicine with her research. She primarily studied the medicinal properties of plants native to India. Throughout her career, her research contributed to the development of drugs that treated epilepsy and malaria. Dr. Chatterjee's most noted contribution to the field, however, was her work on vinca alkaloids. Alkaloids are compounds made from plants, often to treat medical ailments. Vinca alkaloids, which come from the Madagascar periwinkle plant, are used today in chemotherapy treatment because they help slow down or stall cancer cells from multiplying.

Dr. Chatterjee's hard work and accomplishments were recognized by Universities all over the world and given accolades from the Indian government, from some of the highest awards in India (like the Padma Bhushan) to being appointed to the Upper House of Parliament!

Dr. Chatterjee embraced collaboration and even founded (and became the head of) the Department of Chemistry at Lady Brabourne College. With her dedication to Indian medicinal plants, she also started a Research institute and mentored many of India's rising chemistry scholars. Today's Doodle celebrates Dr. Chatterjee's 100th birthday with an homage to this astounding woman and her great accomplishments in the name of science.

 

Discover more about Dr. Asima Chatterjee's life and work by visiting Google Arts & Culture.

Location: Austria, Canada, Croatia, Greece, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Portugal, Singapore, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States

Tags: Sciences

selenak: (Schreiben by Poisoninjest)
[personal profile] selenak
Back when I marathon-read Philip Kerr's Bernie Gunther series, I saw he's also authored a lot of novels for children, and had a new one coming out this month, a standalone called Frederick the Great Detective, which, however, mysteriously seems to be available in German before it is in English. (Mysterious because Kerr's Scottish and writes in English, and the novel, which got released today, is indeed translated from the English original, I checked the imprint.) Anyway, the novel has a very similar premise to a movie I saw at last year's Munich Film Festival, Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday - the review I wrote about the film is here: boy falls in love with Emil and the Detectives, befriends its author, Erich Kästner, in the twilight of the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich ensues, boy tries to maintain ideals of novel versus increasingly awful reality. Having read the novel now, I can add a further parallel: both Friedrich in Frederick the Great Detective and Hans in Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday have an older sibling who is enthusastically joining the Nazi cause. My original suspicion as to why Kerr picked a fictional main character instead of Hans, who actually existed and did befriend Erich Kästner, was because Hans' fate was sealed by history, and that Kerr wanted a better fate for his young hero. Spoilers ensue. )However, by that point, I had already guessed various other reasons why Kerr chose a fictional over a fictionalized "real" main character, and the differences to Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday are instructive here.

For starters, there's the difference in focus: Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday is, as far as Hans is concerned, a coming of age story - he goes from child to teenager and young man in the course of the story - and has Erich Kästner as the other lead, whose perspective through the movie is even the slightly favored one. Frederick the Great Detective, by contrast, has Kästner only as a supporting character, aside from a prologue and an epilogue ends in late 1933/early 1934, and is above all a homage to Kästner's novel in structure, focusing on Friedrich and his same-age friends, who play detectives until it gets lethally dangerous. (The adults, whether benevolent or malignant or in between, are seen from the outside, the point of view is Friedrich's throughout.) For, befitting the author of the Gunther mysteries, there are actually cases to solve. (Though as opposed to Bernie, young Friedrich - who wants to become a detective through much of the novel - gets the point that you can't be a detective in a system where the criminals have taken over when Kästner desperately tells him just this.)

Indeed, while reading I wondered whether the basic idea for the novel might not have been a wish to write a sequel to Emil which tackles how Emil & Co. would act when the Third Reich starts, because Friedrich's gang with its twins has some similarities. Then again, Friedrich has a distinctly different background to Emil (or Hans Löhr) - no working class single parent mother, instead, middle class parents with his father a journalist and friend of Kästner's, which is the original connection, which allows Kerr to depict the way the press lost its freedom within a year. It also allows Kerr to let Friedrich and his parents vacation on Rügen where Friedrich meets Christopher Isherwood and Isherwood's boyfriend Heinz on the beach. (Leading to a charming scene where Friedrich manages to solve his very first case by finding Isherwood's lost watch.) Kerr provides quite a lot of real life characters making cameos throughout the novel - Billy Wilder (during the premiere of the "Emil and the Detectives" movie version which he scripted), Max Liebermann, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Walter Trier etc. - but the Isherwood cameo was for me the most vivid of these. (And I'm not surprised, having come across an interview where Kerr says bascially Berlin for him as a reader, before he got there, was invented by two British writers, Christopher Isherwood and John Le Carré.)

Kästner himself lis of course the real life character with the most page time, but he feels more like a generic version of Kästner's author persona than an actual attempt at depiction of the man. (As opposed to the Kästner in Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday.) Meaning: he's a benevolent adult the way, say, Justus the Teacher in "Das Fliegende Klassenzimmer" is, with no hint of any inner conflicts, and Kerr slims down the biographical and authorial data about him to "wrote Emil and the Detective, also works as a journalist"; in this book, there are no mentions of either Kästner's other books for children or his adult novel, Fabian (the one who got burned by the Nazis at the 1933 book burning), nor of his sharp political poetry (which in Germany he was and is almost as well known for as for his prose). (Hence ahistorically Emil ends up as the burned book, when in rl Emil and the Detectives was so popular that it got published, as the only one of Kästner's works, within Germany until 1936. Then it was for the axe as well.) The one biographical background fact about Kästner mentioned in conversation by Friedrich's father is in fact a wrong one, or rather, a wrong assumption, that Kästner's mother, like Emil's, raised her son alone. In rl, not only was Kästner's father around and in contact with his son, but he outlived Kästner's mother. There is, however, a reason why I didn't mind this particular wrong statement, which is: Kästner kept his father and his relationship with him very low key as long as his mother was still alive, while his relationship with his mother was intense and very public, so a colleague from work like Friedrich's father could be forgiven for assuming the guy was either dead or had left the family. ( If you've read Kästner's autobiographical writings, one of the most memorable childhood scenes which makes you cringe in sympathy is his parents' christmas competition about him, when his father, a craftsman, proudly presented presents he made with his own hand while his mother spent all her money on presents, and both parents would regard whichever present their son showed any favour to as proof whom he loved more or a rejection respectively. And thus it went on for as long as Kästner's mother lived.)

What the novel does really well, though, is presenting a group of children responding to their world changing radically, and Friedrich as a likeable child hero who ends up rejecting the demagogery, scapegoating and promise of glory that lures his older brother in because he sees how both people he knows and strangers are abused in its name. Again, in an homage to Kästner's novel which has a memorable dream sequence, Friedrich's ongoing crisis of conscience and wonder how to avoid becoming a Nazi himself climaxes in a surreal dream where the various things he has experienced come together. The lesson he draws from this is simple and profound at the same time, very Kästnerian and indeed great advice in current day circumstances as well, to the question as ow to act: Be kind. Being kind and you can't become what you fear and hate. Be kind.

Mind you, the 1945 prologue and epilogue does spoilery things ) But all in all, Frederick the Great Detective is still a very readable children's novel set in a dark time which also manages to pay homage to a classic while being its own thing.

Cool Stuff Friday

Sep. 22nd, 2017 11:41 am
jimhines: (Snoopy Writing)
[personal profile] jimhines

Friday has been having trouble keeping up on the blogging lately…

Mirrored from Jim C. Hines.

Rhoda's Favorite Music: Part One

Sep. 22nd, 2017 10:58 am
rhoda_rants: (gerard)
[personal profile] rhoda_rants
Because I’m in a list-making mood and why not?

For a number of reasons, it occurred to me I’ve never done a comprehensive list of all my bandoms. I post music-related stuff fairly often, especially when I’m in SHINY NEW BAND, BUY ALL THE THINGS mode, as I am now. Still, it is very difficult to narrow my faves down to 10. I have my All-Time Favorites, which don’t change, and I’m pretty sure everyone knows what they are. (If you don’t, you’re about to.) There are four of them, so my Top 5 are those plus the New Shiny.

But what about the rest of them? My “favorites” on a lower tier than my All-Time Faves, music I really love but not on obsession-level anymore? I’m talking about bands I’ve probably seen live once or twice, that I have all or most of their albums, former BUY ALL THE THINGS artists that have since been shuffled down to my regular rotation. For now, I’m not including solo artists or bands I just *kinda* like but haven’t formed a strong emotional attachment to, or bands that I’ve shelved for later because I know I’d be totally obsessed if I looked them up properly. (This shelf is necessary. You guys know how I get when I have a new obsession. That's a year-long commitment or longer, depending on how many albums they have out by the time I find them.)

This is going to be a three-parter. “5 favorite songs” are the first ones that occur to me, because it is never just five songs. I’m not listing concert DVDs or documentaries unless they come with an accompanying audio disc.

Right--let’s do this!

ALL-TIME FAVORITES )

Poem #22: Septmeber 1815

Sep. 22nd, 2017 11:20 am
alexcat: (Default)
[personal profile] alexcat
September 1815

WHILE not a leaf seems faded; while the fields,
With ripening harvest prodigally fair,
In brightest sunshine bask; this nipping air,
Sent from some distant clime where Winter wields
His icy scimitar, a foretaste yields
Of bitter change, and bids the flowers beware;
And whispers to the silent birds, 'Prepare
Against the threatening foe your trustiest shields.'
For me, who under kindlier laws belong
To Nature's tuneful quire, this rustling dry
Through leaves yet green, and yon crystalline sky,
Announce a season potent to renew,
'Mid frost and snow, the instinctive joys of song,
And nobler cares than listless summer knew.


~~ William Wordsworth
[syndicated profile] captainawkward_feed

Posted by JenniferP

Dear Captain,

My question today is about academia and/or job opportunities and being single. I am a PhD candidate in a Very Good University in the US, and I will be on the academic job market in a year. I have a very good publication/presentation/committee/topic situation, so I should be doing fairly fine. However, my field is totally dominated by men, mostly from quite conservative countries/cultures. It’s even worse in industry (I have work experience pre-PhD and an internship).

Now, I am absolutely sure I don’t want to get married or have a cohabiting partner or “serious” relationship of any sort. If anything, I identify with relationship anarchy. I am happy like I’ve never been, and I feel like I’m thriving and my best self arises when I am alone and free. I do have many short and long romance stories with like-minded folks who are in the same line of thought, but I don’t have or want any “boyfriend” in the sense that other people seem to want me to have (focused on dating – getting engaged – moving in – marrying).

Usually, in academic conferences, in the informal networking events, or in my department, I get asked when I will be on the market, and if I prioritize going back to my country or staying in the US, this kind of things. I think it’s all fair game and I am thrilled some Big Names in the field show interest in me! But sometimes they ask things such as “will you have a 2-body problem?” or “well, eventually you’ll want to marry, right?” or “our school is in a city with plenty of young men!”. Or more bluntly “how come you are not married yet?” (my age – early 30s – is not a secret). I know those (mostly old, mostly men, mostly conservative) professors may just be trying to be nice(?), but I can tell by the way they look that I don’t fit in what they think is “a good woman” or “a normal person”.

I have told some (younger – some younger than me) professors in my department that I don’t want to marry and they all reply condescendingly “you’ll change your mind!” But they are not the ones who’ll make my hiring decisions (although they’ll write me letters of recommendation) and so I am not that much concerned. What about those from other schools who may want to hire or not hire me a year from now when I am on the market? When I have 5-minute interactions and they ask me topic/advisor/ideal placement/marital status. Should I tell them “I don’t want to marry” and out myself immediately as not-their-idea-of-good-woman? Should I tell them “oh I haven’t found anyone yet” and then lie (or risk that someone will try to set me up – it’s happened before!)? Should I just smile awkwardly and say “I don’t know!”? I also feel that, when I say I don’t want to marry, the person in front of me thinks I am lying. What if I tell them “no, I don’t want to marry, but I do want to have kids and I am very well informed about sperm banks and adoption agencies”. Will this kill forever all my job opportunities because of the single mother stigma?

It’s all a paradox, because they don’t like women because of the whole marriage and maternity thing, but they don’t like it either when women don’t conform to their standards of womanhood (wifehood?).

How can I navigate this? I do want to have a good academic placement but I want to know who won’t be supportive of my lifestyle to avoid their departments. But also, you know, academia is sometimes hard and there isn’t much choice of placement for a candidate. So at this point I mostly want to say something that won’t close all the doors but will make my point clear enough.

Any help will be welcome! Thanks so much!

Future Professor Badass

Dear Future Professor Badass,

As tempting as it would be to say a robotic “That is a sexist question” or give a long rambling Boring Baroque Response involving your theories of Relationship Anarchy whenever this comes up, here is the strategy I actually advise:

Them:Will you have a two-body problem?” (For people outside of academia, this means will you need the university that wants to recruit you to also factor in a job for your a fellow-professor spouse) or “But surely you intend to marry someday?” (Ugh) or “Good thing there are lots of young men here!

You:Thanks for asking. I’m lucky that I don’t have to consider that right now in my search and can just look for the best fit for my work.

Them:How come you are not married yet?” (This is a weird, rude question but I too have had older people from outside the US ask me this as if it’s a normal question. Then again, we in the US ask people what they do for a job right away, for this week’s Manners Are Relative reminder).

You: Smile awkwardly and say “I don’t know!“, as you suggest! Or, “It just hasn’t been a priority!” or “Search me!” or “I love being single” or “Has my grandmother been talking to you? It’s a question under much discussion in my family, believe me” or “Haven’t felt like it, I guess!

Whatever you say, keep it light and vague. The more you can answer calmly and confidently, without apology, the more people will take your cue in how they react.

 

 

I know all of this is sexist and invasive and weird and assumes heterosexuality when it should not but the individual people who ask you this think they are being kind and even helpful, especially if they are trying to recruit you to their campus. They want you to be happy and anticipate issues that they might have to work around so that you will want to stay forever at their school. They want to figure out if they have the budget to hire you and a spouse if they want you badly enough. They don’t want you to take the job and then leave in a year because it’s a romantic and sexual wasteland or because there’s no industry in the town except for the university and your (theoretical) partner can’t find work. It can be awkward attempt to mentor you, at least in some cases, so if you can find a way to be vague but positive and deal with the intentions (rather than the effects) of the question it will help you connect.

I wish it were not so, but right now you need a job so someday you can be the colleague who doesn’t ask newcomers these questions (or asks in a way that is actually helpful).

Answer with your vague positive statement, some version of “It’s not my biggest priority right now, which makes me feel very lucky! I have the luxury to just think about finding the right fit for the work I want to do. I know not everyone has that.

Then ask them questions about their lives.

  • “When you moved to [City Where University Is Located] what was it like to get your bearings?”
  • “Any advice for settling in in [City]? Where do the people who love it here shop/eat/hike/live?”
  • “Was it a difficult adjustment moving from [Country of Origin] to [City]? What was the biggest surprise?”
  • “What are the things about [City] that really make you feel at home?”
  • “Were you married when you moved here? How does your spouse like it here? What do they do?”
  • “How did you and your spouse meet?”
  • “Did you have to deal with a two-body problem? What was that like? How does the university generally deal with those?”
  • “What do you remember most from your first year of being a professor here?”

You can turn the conversation to their research or their teaching or questions about the students or the department, too. People like to be asked questions about things they are experts on, and in my experience professors like this even more than most people. Use their weird question as an opportunity to make a human connection and find out more about them as people and the place as a place to live and what you’re getting into. Be remembered as someone pleasant to talk to, focused on her work, and someone who asks good questions and is a good listener.

You’ve got this and you don’t need to make excuses for something that isn’t actually a problem. Good luck in your search.

 

 

 


You know you play too much WoW when

Sep. 22nd, 2017 09:55 am
dragovianknight: (WoW - Hardwire - LOL)
[personal profile] dragovianknight
You see someone with the screen name "Origami Heart" and what you READ is "Orgrim's Heart".

(no subject)

Sep. 22nd, 2017 09:45 am
alexseanchai: Blue and purple lightning (Default)
[personal profile] alexseanchai
[personal profile] analise010 is doing a one-card draw to raise money to test as an actuary.

New Zealand Elections 2017

Sep. 22nd, 2017 01:44 pm
[syndicated profile] googledoodles_feed

New Zealand Elections 2017

Date: September 23, 2017

New Zealanders head to the polls today to elect the members of their country’s 52nd Parliament. Back in the 1850s when the first general election was held, citizens spoke the name of their preferred candidate to a polling official. Voting was organized at the local level, meaning elections could stretch over weeks or even months!

Today, the process is much speedier, and open to any permanent resident aged 18 and older. General elections happen every three years and must now be held on a Saturday, which means the exact date changes. One thing has stayed the same – Kiwis are proud to cast their votes and shape the future of their country.

Location: New Zealand

Tags: Current Event, History, Election, Voting

Interesting Links for 22-09-2017

Sep. 22nd, 2017 12:00 pm
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[personal profile] andrewducker

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